A little country murder.

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Frank Costello, The Prime Minister of the Mob

 

Better Than That (the Ballad of Uncle Frank.)

Back in 1920

folks was acting kinda’ funny

and we couldn’t even get us a drink

except the rot gut moonshine

kind that make you go blind

mixed right in the kitchen sink

Yeah, it was hard, hard times, there was no denying

and folks could only fritter and frat

but there was nothin you could do

because you couldn’t get no better than that

Then along came a man

and you know he had a plan

to get all of them good times back

just bring the good stuff down, pass the word around

you can betcha’ wallets gonna’ get fat

and it turned out true

all you had to do

was keep your eyes watchin’ your back

that whiskey poured like gold

and you couldn’t get no better than that

Well it didn’t take long

till everywhere he roamed

he got the red carpet, welcome mat

So the ships rolled in

with the whiskey and the gin

and the boys let the good times roar

running Rum Row miles, stacking dough up in piles

and the people only lined up for more

and them bulls in blue, knew exactly what to do

just keep the cool and take home your pad

that whiskey weighed like gold

and ya’ couldn’t get no better than that

But it didn’t take long

between the money and the guns

until you could hear the shotguns crack

Well it’s sad but true

the hardest thing to do

is just to make it to the end of the track

and for those chosen few

here’s to how you do

let’s give em’ all a tip of the hat

it ain’t the same these days

think it’s safe to say

they just don’t make em’ like that

so let the stories be told, because it never got no better than that

here’s to those days of old, you know it never got no better than that

 

To learn more about Frank’s Las Vegas tour click here.

Don’t forget to listen to Aaron on the Big Dumb Fun Show, live on Monday nights.

To go to the store click here

To rent Gangland Wire, the documentary, click here

To subscribe on iTunes click here, give me a review and I will send you a link to see the film for free.

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Aaron and I discuss the latest terrorist incidents in Europe.

Don’t forget to listen to Aaron on the Big Dumb Fun Show, live on Monday nights.

To go to the store click here

To rent Gangland Wire, the documentary, click here

To subscribe on iTunes click here, give me a review and I will send you a link to see the film for free.

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Murder is the topic by the punk group 999, listen to Homicide.

I believe in homicide I rest my case, / Don’t cast a sigh you’d better believe it, / That’s the truth of it take it or leave it, / Resign to it homicide, homicide, homicide, homicide

 

Going back to the old days. After Jesse and Frank James, Billy the Kid may be the most well known outlaw in the United States. Marty Robbins has been a favorite of mine for a long time.

Make sure you attend one of more of the headliners, our co-host, Aaron Gnirk, has scheduled. if you are a Gangland Wire fan, be sure to find Aaron and tell him hello. Click here to go to the website and get tickets.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And on to the crime song of the week, people who died.

Reminds me of the time we caught a member of the Piru Family Bloods coming off the Amtrak from Los Angeles with 5 kilos of powder. He said, Send Lawyers, Guns and Money.

Don’t forget to listen to Aaron on the Big Dumb Fun Show, live on Monday nights.
To go to the store click here

To rent Gangland Wire, the documentary, click here

To subscribe on iTunes click here, give me a review and I will send you a link to see the film for free.

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The Ballad of Thunder Road is a story of moonshine, fast cars, attractive lounge singers, Dixie Mafia and a resolute Revenue agent. Click here to see the full movie. The title song was done by the film’s star, Robert Mitchum. Here, Scott (our resident music producer), recommends the R. B. Morris version.

 


Don’t forget to listen to Aaron on the Big Dumb Fun Show, live on Monday nights.
To go to the store click here

To rent Gangland Wire, the documentary, click here

To subscribe on iTunes click here, give me a review and I will send you a link to see the film for free.

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Ruben “Hurricane” Carter was a famous professional boxer in the 1960s. He fought six times in 1963, winning four bouts and losing two. He was in the top 10 Middleweights when he surprised the boxing world by flooring past and future world champion Emile Griffith twice in the first round and scoring a technical knockout. That win resulted in Carter being ranked the number three contender for the world middleweight title. Carter won two more fights in 1964, before meeting Joey Giardello, the Middleweight champ. Carter fought well in the early rounds, landing a few solid rights to the head and staggering Giardello in the fourth, but failed to follow them up. After Giardello took command of the fight in the fifth round, The judges awarded Giardello a unanimous decision.

After that fight, Carter’s ranking began to decline. He fought nine times in 1965, winning five but losing three of four against contenders Luis Manuel Rodríguez, Dick Tiger, and Harry Scott. Dick Tiger floored Carter three times in their match. Carter would later say, “Tiger gave me the worst beating that I took in my life—inside or outside the ring.”

Carter’s career record in boxing was 27 wins, 12 losses, and one draw in 40 fights, with 19 total knockouts (8 KOs and 11 TKOs).

At the end of Carter’s boxing career, he was floored by a blow he did not see coming. On June 17, 1966, at approximately 2:30 a.m., two men entered the Lafayette Bar and Grill at East 18th Street at Lafayette Street in Paterson, New Jersey, and began shooting. The bartender, James Oliver, and a male customer, Fred Nauyoks, were killed instantly. A severely wounded female customer, Hazel Tanis, died almost a month later. A third customer, Willie Marins, survived the attack, despite a gunshot wound to the head that cost him the sight in one eye. During questioning, both Marins and Tanis told police that the shooters had been black males, though neither identified Carter. Petty criminal Alfred Bello, who had been near the Lafayette that night to burglarize a factory, was an eyewitness. Bello later testified that he was approaching the Lafayette when two black males—one carrying a shotgun, the other a pistol—came around the corner walking towards him. He ran from them, and they got into a white car that was double-parked near the Lafayette. Both Bello and another witness would describe a white car as the get away vehicle.

About 30 minutes after the murders, Patterson N. J, police stopped Ruben Carter and a man named John Artis driving a white car. Police took Carter and Artis to police headquarters and questioned them. The witnesses could not identify them as the killers, and they were released. Several months later, Bello disclosed to the police that he had an accomplice during the attempted burglary, Arthur Dexter Bradley. On further questioning, Bello and Bradley identified Carter as one of the two males they had seen carrying weapons outside the bar the night of the murders. Bello also identified Artis as the other. Based on this additional evidence, Carter and Artis were arrested and indicted for the murders. A jury would give both men life sentences for these crimes.

Carter would win a second trial after Bello and Bradley retracted their identifications. The defense learned that Bello was given a large amount of money for his cooperation. Despite these facts, Carter was again convicted. Three years later, Carter’s attorneys filed a petition for a writ of habeas corpus in federal court. In 1985, Judge Haddon Lee Sarokin of the United States District Court for the District of New Jersey granted the writ, noting that the prosecution had been “predicated upon an appeal to racism rather than reason, and concealment rather than disclosure,” and set aside the convictions. Carter, 48 years old, was freed without bail in November 1985, after a failed appeal, New Jersey prosecutors dropped all charges. Ruben ” Hurricane” Carter moved to Canada and became a motivational speaker active in projects helping wrongfully convicted persons. He died in 2014. An interesting fact, John Artis, the man convicted with him in New Jersey, was released on parole during this time. In Carter’s last years, he and Artis remained friends and Artis would be his caretaker as he died of cancer.

Thanks to Wikipedia for the story and photo.

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Either this killer was a nutcase or Lilli Schull must have really pissed him off this time.

 

A great crowd has now gathered
All around the jail today
To see me executed
And hear what I do say
Now I must hang this morning
For the murder of Lilli Schull
Whom I so cruelly murdered
And her body shamefully burned